Dyslexia is a Specific Learning Difficulty (SpLDs). It was a German physician called Rudolf Berlin who refined our definition of reading problems, using the term “dyslexia”; to describe a “very great difficulty in interpreting written or printed symbols.”


More On Dyslexia
Dyslexia / Specific Learning Difficulties affects 4% of the population. Problems can show themselves in reading, writing, number work, short-term memory, hand control and visual processing. Timekeeping, sense of direction and interpersonal skills can also be affected. These difficulties often result in significant frustration, bearing in mind that dyslexics are usually of average or above average intelligence.

Until recently people thought that Dyslexia affected more males than females. However, this may not be the case. It is now believed that girls are not being identified in the same way as boys.

Many of these children are incredibly bright in lots of ways, always talking and asking questions. And yet they do not seem to reach their full potential in the academic field. An excellent definition of Dyslexia is by Dr J E Cullis, 1992, who wrote:

definition of dyslexia

‘Dyslexia means having difficulty with words in reading, spelling and writing – in spite of having normal intelligence and ability’.
by Dr J E Cullis , 1992

I believe one of the significant advances in dyslexia will be in the area of genetics and it may not be too long before babies are tested at birth thereby enabling help to be available at a very early age.

Dyslexia is a registered disability under the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) 2004.

Definition of Dyslexia

Dyslexia (pronounced: dis-lex-ia) affects approximately 10% of the population, 4% severely. Problems can show themselves in reading, writing, number work, short-term memory, hand control and visual processing. Timekeeping, sense of direction and interpersonal skills can also be affected.

 

Definition of Dyslexia

 

‘Dyslexia means having difficulty with words in reading, spelling and writing – in spite of having normal intelligence and ability’.

by Dr J E Cullis, 1992

It is very important to recognise dyslexia as soon as possible, before it impacts on a child’s self-esteem. There is no single set of signs that characterise all dyslexics.

There is a lot more information to help you in my books. I have listed a couple below:

‘Dyslexia and other Learning Difficulties – The Essential Guide’ – book

My book: ‘Dyslexia and Other Learning Difficulties – A Parent’s Guide’, contains extensive information on dyslexia and other specific learning difficulties (SpLDs).

For a fuller description of ‘Dyslexia and Other Learning Difficulties – A Parent’s Guide‘ . See more ….

‘Dyslexia and Alternative Therapies’ – book

My book: ‘Dyslexia and Alternative Therapies’ contains information on a wide range of alternative therapies and the way they can help people with dyslexia and other specific learning difficulties (SpLDs).

For a fuller description of ‘Dyslexia and Alternative Therapies‘ . See more ….

What Causes Dyslexia

There is no single ’cause’ of developmental dyslexia. The way in which dyslexia affects people differs from individual to individual, as do the reasons for the specific difficulties experienced.

Children learn language and literacy skills best when they are young. If they have hearing problems (like ‘glue ear’) during this time, this can affect some children’s language abilities. Similarly, visual problems when they are learning to read can affect their ability to pick up reading skills. Such visual problems (e.g. unstable or blurred vision) can confuse children and make reading very difficult, but this can often be improved by viewing through yellow or blue filters. Also, many children have problems translating the letters into the sounds they stand for because they don’t hear the sounds enough.

The basic cause or causes of developmental dyslexia are not fully understood, and are the major focus of our research. It is an inherited condition, which appears to affect more boys than girls. Clear differences in the way the brain is wired up during development have been found in people with dyslexia. These may result from abnormalities in a particular class of ‘magnocellular’ nerve cell; possibly due to inheriting genes that make them vulnerable to immune factors during development of the brain and to deficiency of the ‘omega-3’ fatty acids, EPA & DHA that are found in oily fish.

Dyslexia Research Trust (DRT

4th October 2013

Dyslexia Treatment

Dyslexia Treatment

As dyslexia is not a disease, there is no ‘treatment’ for it.

Dyslexia – Learning through Play

However, you can help a student with dyslexia, by using Multi-Sensory Teaching Methods and developing skills through play and lots of encouragement.

What is Multi-Sensory?

I am frequently being asked by parents and students, ‘what does multi-sensory mean’. Multi-Sensory means merely, using: eyes, ears, touch, taste and smell.


Dyslexia Treatment – Playing with things Like:

• Practising letter formation in sand/salt trays. (I use cat litter trays they are very cheap.)
• Using chalk or coloured pens, to do letter formation on black/white board.
• Shape and pattern copying.
• Using ‘Spirograph’ to practice writing – write, shake it and it goes away.
• Tracking objects to their ‘homes’, i.e., tracing along the line back to the rabbit hutch etc.
• Colouring in ‘mosaics’ or ‘paint by number’ are excellent to improve ‘fine motor’ control, (much better than simply writing).
• Colouring in old-fashioned ‘doylies’ (for cakes) is another way to improve fine-motor control.
• Threading coloured beads.
• Jigsaws.
• Juggling.
• Swimming.

Dyslexia – Developing Skills, including:

* Sequencing
* Space organisation
* Directional awareness
* Strategies.

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