Help & Resources

There is a lot of helpful information and useful equipment to help people with dyslexia; you will find some below:


Help & Advice

National Literacy Trust
The National Literacy Trust links home, school and the wider community to inspire learners and create opportunities for everyone. We support those who work with learners through our innovative programmes, information and research. We bring together key organisations to lead literacy promotion in the UK
www.literacytrust.org

I Before E (Except After C)
Struggle to recall the basic facts and rules of spelling, grammar, history, maths and more? This bestselling compilation brings together all the old-school ways to remember stuff. Memory aids such as rhymes (30 days hath September … ). Just 9.95.
www.amazon.co.uk

British Dyslexia Association
is the voice of dyslexic people in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. One of the world’s leading dyslexia organisations.
www.bdadyslexia.org.uk

Hornsby International Charity
Hornsby International is a dyslexia charity group. Hornsby International provides training, diagnosis, support, books and general education about dyslexia.
www.hornsby.co.uk

Helen Arkell Centre
Services for dyslexics, learning difficulties, specialist teacher training for teaching individuals with dyslexia, adults with dyslexia, speech and language.
www.arkellcentre.org.uk

Davis Dyslexia Association
International: Creative talents and learning disabilities, effective methods to teach reading and overcome academic problems.
www.dyslexia.com

The International Dyslexia Association. 
Formerly the Orton Dyslexia Association. Provides resources for professionals and families dealing with individuals with reading disabilities.
www.dyslexiaida.com

Dyslexia Teacher 
information and resources for teachers of children with dyslexia: teaching methods, recognizing dyslexia, assessment books, news and research.
www.dyslexia.com

Dyslexic.com 
Software for dyslexia, talking computers, text to speech synthesis, speech recognition and TextHelp.
www.dyslexia.com

Levinson Medical Centre for Learning Disabilities 
is dedicated to resolving misconceptions of dyslexia and related attention deficit and anxiety disorders. www.dyslexiaonline.com

Bristol Dyslexia Centre
Find out more about dyslexia and famous dyslexics. Online learning/teaching system with cartoons, games, fun resources, Nessy and Silly Bull.
www.dyslexiacentre.co.uk

Dyslexia Research Trust 
A charity established to support research into the nature and causes of developmental dyslexia and to help children with visually impaired dyslexic problems.
www.dyslexic.org.uk

Bangor Dyslexia Unit 
brief details on the Bangor University Dyslexia Unit. 
www.dyslexia.bangor.ac.uk

Learning Disabilities & Mental Health
The experiences resulting from having a learning disability increases the likelihood of having a mental health problem. A 2007 study found that 20-40% of people with learning disabilities had a mental health problem.
Learning Disabilities & Mental Health

Dyslexia & Bullying

 

Many students’ with Dyslexia and other Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD’s) suffer from bullying because they may be seen by some of their peers as ‘different’ and usually take longer to do things, like, reading, spelling etc.

I know of someone with a six year old boy and when the children did their writing, they had to keep going up to the teacher’s desk to ask for a word to be spelt out, the child would write about ten words and spent the entire 20 minute session stood in the queue at the teacher’s desk. Isn’t that ridiculous and the other children would pick on him because he was stood there all the time and the teacher would make remarks like, ‘not you again’, ‘can’t you spell anything’. This was just asking for problems as if the child didn’t have enough already. The other children soon picked up on this and then they join in too. Some teachers need to re-think this method of ‘teaching’.

Nobody, regardless of age, should have to put up with being bullied. Treat people as you expect to be treated. Respect each other and ‘Stamp out Bullying Now’!

We all know how traumatic bullying is!

Many of you know just how traumatic it can be when your children are being bullied at school; some of us will have been bullied ourselves when we were younger. I am not talking about the one-off isolated case, (although this is not very nice), but children who are being bullied on a regular basis. Whilst many parents may have tried to deal with the situation when it arose, it would appear dealing with the problem at the time, is not the end of it at all.

There have been many studies on bullying, but the following research is the first to look at how bullying affected students in mid-life. This study by King’s College London analysed over 7,000 cases of children born in 1958. The results showed that many men and women who had been bullied at school, were at higher risk of developing:

Weight-related issues, i.e., 
Overweight
Obesity

 

Mental health problems, i.e., 
Such as Depression
Alcoholism

 

Higher blood inflammation leading to
Type-2 Diabetes
A higher risk of Strokes and
Cardiovascular (heart) disease.

In many cases in the media over the last few years, we have often heard schools have thought it best to move the student being bullied out of the situation. This has outraged many parents because their child who has done nothing wrong is moved and the bully is not punished. Doesn’t seem fair, does it? It would appear that schools find this easiest. All schools have programmes to help prevent bullying behaviours, but this would often be at the cost of neglecting the children’s misery.

This is the first time; it appears that we now have proof that early intervention can help to stop these problems later on in life.

Who would have thought that by being bullied when you were at school could mean you were at higher risk of such serious health issues.

We must ‘Stamp out Bullying Now!’


 

Help & Support

Are you being Bullied? Do you know someone who is? There are several excellent websites that can offer – free, confidential help for young people under 25. Get non-judgemental advice and support.

Kidscape

Help & support at: Kidscape

Our mission is to provide children, families, carers and professionals with advice, training and practical tools to prevent bullying and protect young lives.

General enquiries: info@kidscape.org.uk (Please note that as they receive a large number of emails, it may take up to five working days to receive a response.)

Website: www.kidscape.org (24/7)

 

NSPCC

Worried about a child?

Contact our trained helpline counsellors for 24/7 help, advice and support.

Email:  help@nspcc.org.uk

Website:  www.nspcc.org.uk

 


n2k-bullying
Is your child being bullied? How do you deal with bullying? How do you talk to children about bullying?

Thomson’s informative guide is an excellent book and will give you a lot of help and advice

 


17-year old takes his own life –
We must ‘Stamp out Bullying Now!’

Another youngster takes his own life after cyberbullying. Why do these cowards find it easier to bully someone online and probably someone they don’t even know? Cowards – I hope they are happy now!

A 17-year-old GAA player, from County Tyrone, was taken “advantage of and exploited” before taking his life over cyber bullying a priest told his mourners.

17-year old takes his own life

We must ‘Stamp out Bullying Now!’

 


Full Research Paper & Contact details:
Notes
Takizawa, R et al. (2015) ‘Bullying victimization in childhood predicts inflammation and obesity at mid-life: a five-decade birth cohort study’ Psychological Medicine doi:10.1017/S0033291715000653
For further media information, please contact Jack Stonebridge, Press Officer, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience,
King’s College London jack.stonebridge@kcl.ac.uk/
For further information about King’s visit our ‘King’s in Brief’ page.

Dyslexia Book List
The Jumble Book (Dyslexia Action) [Unabridged] [Paperback]
This book looks fantastic, for children to read or parents to read to the younger ones, its really colourful to keep their attention.

The_Jumble_Book

Dyslexia and other Learning Difficulties
Author(s): Maria Chivers
Qualifications: ISBN: 1861440421
Pub Date:

Practical Strategies for Living with Dyslexia
Author(s): Maria Chivers
Qualifications: ISBN: 185302905
Pub Date:

Dyslexia and Alternative Therapies
Author(s): Maria Chivers
Qualifications: ISBN: 1843103788
Pub Date: 31/08/2006

Dyslexia: A Teenager’s Guide
Author(s): Dr Sylvia Moody
Qualifications: ISBN: 0091900018
Publisher: Vermilion Press 2004
Pub Date: 2004

Overcoming Dyslexia‘ by Beve Hornsby ( pub. Macdonald Optima )

This Book Doesn’t Make Sense‘ by Jean Augur ( pub. Bath Ed )

Dyslexia – A Parent’s Survival Guide by Christine Ostler, (pub. Ammonite Books )

Day-to-Day Dyslexia in the Classroom‘ by Joy Pollock and Elisabeth Waller. (pub. Routledge)

How to Detect and Manage Dyslexia‘ by Philomena Ott (pub. Heinemann)

The Deceitful Dyslexic’ by Alex Nile.
A dyslexic member of Dyslexia Forum wrote, “Its a good read about a
dyslexic in the workplace who goes through a personal discovery of why
he does things.” Its an ebook, available for text to speech on a Kindle.
77p.

Amazon

More Dyslexia Links

There is a lot of help and advice available, often the problem is locating it. A few helpful organisations are below:

Swindon Dyslexia Centre
Maria Chivers is an author of four books on dyslexia and as she puts it is, ‘dedicated to raising awareness of dyslexia’. 
www.swindondyslexiacentre.co.uk

British Dyslexia Association
is the voice of dyslexic people in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. One of the world’s leading dyslexia organisations.
www.bdadyslexia.org.uk

Bristol Dyslexia Centre
Find out more about dyslexia and famous dyslexics. Online learning/teaching system with cartoons, games, fun resources, Nessy and Silly Bull.
www.dyslexiacentre.co.uk

Indigo Dyslexia Centre
Charity, helping Dyslexic Parents, Childrens and Adults.
www.indigodyslexiacentre.co.uk

Helen Arkell Centre
Services for dyslexics, learning difficulties, specialist teacher training for teaching individuals with dyslexia, adults with dyslexia, speech and language.
www.arkellcentre.org.uk

Davis Dyslexia Association International:
Creative talents and learning disabilities, effective methods to teach reading and overcome academic problems.
www.dyslexia.com

The International Dyslexia Association
Welcome! The International Dyslexia Association (IDA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping individuals with dyslexia, their families and the communities that support them.
dyslexiaida.org

Dyslexia Teacher
information and resources for teachers of children with dyslexia: teaching methods, recognizing dyslexia, assessment books, news and research. 
www.dyslexia-teacher.com

Dyslexic.com 
Software for dyslexia, talking computers, text to speech synthesis, speech recognition and TextHelp. 
www.dyslexic.com

Levinson Medical Centre for Learning Disabilities 
is dedicated to resolving misconceptions of dyslexia and related attention deficit and anxiety disorders.
www.dyslexiaonline.com

Dyslexia Research Trust 
A charity established to support research into the nature and causes of developmental dyslexia and to help children with visually impaired dyslexic problems.
www.dyslexic.org.uk

Bangor Dyslexia Unit 
brief details on the Bangor University Dyslexia Unit. 
www.dyslexia.bangor.ac.uk

(CReSTeD) – The Council for the Registration of Schools Teaching Dyslexic Pupils 
Register of schools that help children with specific learning difficulties (dyslexia).
www.crested.org.uk

The National Association for Special Educational Needs (NASEN)
NASEN aims to promote the education, training, advancement and development of all those with special educational needs. NASEN produces the following journals: British Journal of Special Education, British Journal of Visual Impairment and Support for Learning.
www.nasen.org.uk

Listening Books
Listening Books is a charity that provides audio books in cassette format via the post to people who have difficulty reading in the usual way.
www.listening-books.org.uk

Barrington Stoke
Barrington Stoke books help children to enjoy reading.
We publish accessible, enjoyable and unpatronising short books for children who are dyslexic, struggling to read, or simply reluctant to sit down with a book. 
www.barringtonstoke.co.uk

Basic Skills Agency – The Basic Skills Tests for Teaching Assistants Course
Designed in line with the new curriculum, The Basic Skills Test for Teaching Assistants provides a consitent and reliable way to check vital literacy, numeracy and IT skills for existing Teaching Assistants or as part of the recruitment process.
www.basic-skills.co.uk

Learning and Work Institute
We want everyone to realise their ambitions and potential in learning, work and throughout life.
www.learningandwork.org.uk

Office for Advice, Assistance, Support and Information on Special Needs (OAASIS)
A resource for parents & professionals caring for children with
Autism / and other learning disabilities.
www.oaasis.co.uk

The Dyslexia Institute
Dyslexia Action is a national charity and the UK’s leading provider of services and support for people with dyslexia and literacy difficulties.
www.dyslexiaaction.org.uk

Abilitynet
National and regional centres. How IT can assist disabled people. Information, advice, factsheets. Assessments of IT needs.
www.abilitynet.org.uk

Arts Dyslexia Trust 
To promote greater understanding and appreciation of minds usually labelled as “dyslexic.”
www.artsdyslexiatrust.org

Education Otherwise
A self-help group of families involved in home education.
www.education-otherwise.org

ISC: Independent Schools Council 
www.iscis.uk.net

European Dyslexia Association
Assists to develop support for dyslexic people in their educational social and cultural integration into society.
www.eda.co.uk


Dyslexia Association of Ireland
It aims to promote awareness of Specific Learning Disability (SLD/Dyslexia) and to serve the needs of people with this difficulty.
www.dyslexia.ie.

World Dyslexia Network Foundation (WDNF)
for international contacts and project details.

www.wdnf.info

Dyslexia International Tools and Technologies (DITT)
www.ditt-online.org

Setting up a support group
When I operated the Swindon Dyslexia Centre, we used to receive hundreds of calls each year asking how you go about setting up a support group in their area.

It is not difficult at all. We all need help and support at some time or another. When your child has special needs, it is easy to feel as if you are the only one in the world. There are thousands of children who have problems with their education. What is needed is to bring parents together to enable them to talk the issues through – to help and advise each other. Your problem will not be a new one. If you are suffering because of it – you can bet there are others out there in the same position.

Why not set up a Dyslexia Support Group?

Why not form a support group in your area? It isn’t as hard as you may think! If you need it, there must be others who will be feeling the same. Don’t wait until someone else does it – because they might not! How do I go about it?

1. Ask other parents, to see if they are interested in joining.
2. Visit your local library, citizens’ advice bureau or other voluntary agencies to see if they have any information that may help you.
3. Ask yourself, what exactly is needed in your area?
4. Do you want to have meetings every week/month?
5. Where will your meetings be? (The first meeting will probably best to be held in a local hall.)
6. Contact the national charity to see what help they can offer.
7. It may be possible to get a guest speaker for your first meeting from a national organisation.
8. Ask other parents to give you a hand. If you don’t ask, you don’t get, that is my maxim – you can’t do everything yourself! It may seem hard at the start but keep going – it gets easier.

Advertising your group

No, I don’t mean by paying for advertisements with the local press. My company does not have an advertising budget at all. The local radio and newspapers need local news – let them know what you are doing. Just contact them by; email, letter or telephone. Don’t forget local news is their business!

How can I arrange a Press Release?

The quickest way to let the press know is a Press Release. Don’t panic. This is very easy. It is just like writing a letter and then taking out all the chitchat, leaving only the bones. Something similar to the one enclosed will be sufficient.

Don’t forget: If you need help, so do other people in the same situation!

Facebook Forum
Unfortunately, we do not always have the time to respond individually to enquiries.

So why not join in a discussion, ask a question or just say ‘hello’ on our ‘Dyslexia Facebook Forum’.

Facebook Dyslexia Forum or our

DyslexiaA2Z Blog